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Discover the surprising impact the colour of your front door could have on the value of your home.

Every home has a front door-the way in and out. It's one of the first things visitors see. As they ring the doorbell or drive past, it's the first glimpse of what may be discovered inside and what secrets will be revealed as the door opens.

As the saying goes, you don't get a second chance to make a good first impression and judgements are often made in just a few seconds. So there isn't long to capture the attention of the perfect buyer for your home.

Perhaps this is why studies have shown that the colour of a front door can actually affect the value of your property. If the colour is off-putting, you may never get the potential buyer across the threshold, and your chance to sell your home to them is lost forever.

 What does your front door say about your home?

The secrets hidden behind a door hold endless possibilities and can build curiosity. Will it be a stylish, contemporary home or a cosy, lived-in family space? Does that door lead to a new life where treasured memories will be made?

Since the Georgian period, we've been obsessed with doors. The entrance to a property represented the occupants' wealth and social standing, so you could see from the outside how influential the owner was.

The fancier the doorway, the better, so they added stained glass, ornate door frames and even columns to show off the elaborate decorations that they could afford.

We all know that a household's income is not represented by a doorway anymore; some of the wealthiest people in the world are the least ostentatious. But perhaps a lot can be learned about a homes' interior from the first impression that the door gives.

What does your front door say about your property? And more importantly, could it be affecting the value?

Colour is a fundamental consideration. It can evoke a particular perception of what lies behind the door.

Is it a stylish, executive property, a quirky, artistic house full of fun and vibrancy, or a calmly sophisticated home?

Bright, bold colours, such as turquoise, pink and yellow, imply a contemporary, fun home and really capture the attention of buyers. With an almost childlike joy and a sense of innocence, these colours appeal to creative arty types and possibly those with a young family.

You would expect muted pale grey, cream or sage green shades at a country home. Lovely colours that are calming and welcoming.

Black front doors are executive and sleek - but ever-so-slightly "Downing Street". Most likely, one would expect to uncover a sensible, sophisticated interior to a property with a black door.

Like a post-box or a London bus, a red front door is very British and conveys a vibrant, passionate personality. Bold interiors with strong accent colours and a modern design, although not too contemporary, is what would be expected in a home with a red door.

Traditional heritage colours are synonymous with period homes. This is a somewhat safe option as you will certainly not divide the opinion of buyers with a conventional heritage colour: think British racing green and royal blue. Still, it will not stand out much against other homes on the market. These deep jewel tones will neither attract nor repel buyers; they are the front-door equivalent of magnolia. Perhaps this is why Royal blue is the most 'valuable' colour. Because it appeals to the broadest range of people?

It is said that having a blue front door can actually make up to £4000 difference in the price of a property! Whereas, sadly, a brown door can actually negatively impact the value of your home, shaving off approximately £400.

Before you all rush off and buy some blue paint, think about the home on the inside. Does your front door reflect the interior? Maybe you could change the colour to more accurately depict your style to attract the perfect buyer for your home?

 
If you have an unusual coloured front door, let us know. We are interested in properties of all types and love finding out more about the home hidden behind the front door.